Flights of Fantasy Reading Challenge 2017

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Hello, Verne of Coffee Bean and Tea Reads here!

This is my third year joining the Flights of Fantasy Reading Challenge, hosted by Alexa Loves Books and Hello, Chelly.

I’ll admit, I failed to reach my reading goals in 2015 and 2016. I do love reading fantasy though, and the intention to read more is there. Now, here I am making a reading commitment once more.

This 2017, I’m going to be realistic and aim to read 12 fantasy reads. I’m a slow reader who enjoys pausing in between passages I find magical and meaningful. I also have other time consuming hobbies including playing board games and video games.

I have stacks of fantasy books on my to-read list including The Kingkiller Chronicles by Patrick Rothfuss. Enjoy my first Flights of Fantasy read for 2017, Rothfuss’s “The Name of the Wind.”

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The Allow of Law by Brandon Sanderson – Book Review

Title: The Alloy of Law
Author: Brandon Sanderson
Release Date: November 8th 2011
Publisher: Tor Books
Series: Mistborn #4

I wanted to move away from static places, where millennia would pass and technology would never change. The plan then was for a second epic trilogy set in an urban era, and a third trilogy set in a futuristic era—with Allomancy, Feruchemy, and Hemalurgy being the common threads that tied them together.

These were the words of Brandon Sanderson in his acknowledgements to The Allow of Law, a prequel to his steampunk-era trilogy of Mistborn novels. If this novel is a taste of what’s to come in the next Mistborn trilogy, I am confident in Sanderson’s ability to set his fantasy novels in steampunk, urban, and futuristic times.

Perhaps we’ll see Mistborn robots and cyborgs, or maybe a Magneto-like character with control over metals. But how will that affect the line between fantasy and science-fiction?

But, I’m getting ahead of myself here.

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The Alloy of Law is lighthearted, action-packed addition to the Mistborn series. I recommend that you read the first Mistborn trilogy before reading this novel, as the latter glosses over much of the exposition on the workings of Allomancy, Feruchemy, and Hemalurgy. There are also references to past books that may confuse new readers.

What works best in this novel is the comedic banter between lead characters Wax and Wayne (even their names sound funny when said together). Their friendship reminds me a lot of the camaraderie between Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson. Also welcome is the star-crossed attraction between Wax and Lady Marasi.

“That hat looks ridiculous.”
“Fortunately, I can change hats,” Wayne said, “while you, sir, are stuck with that face.” – Brandon Sanderson, The Alloy of Law

The huge dose of humor in this novel is a welcome break from the doom and gloom seriousness of the last one. But I can already see undertones of a much deeper story that will surely develop in the upcoming trilogy.

The Alloy of Law features a different kind of action compared to the first trilogy. At first, I found myself nostalgic for the swords, knives, staves, shields, and horseshoes. But I found myself getting used to all the guns and brawling after a couple of battle scenes.

I think Brandon Sanderson has much room to explore regarding how his magic system can work with gunpowder weapons—perhaps including the ability to influence the movement of bullets mid-flight—and I look forward to seeing what he comes up with in future novels.

The mark of a great man is one who knows when to set aside the important things in order to accomplish the vital ones. – Brandon Sanderson, The Alloy of Law

Miles is a very powerful antagonist, but I would have preferred an opponent who isn’t invulnerable. His healing powers reminded me too much of Wolverine, who I think is one of the most overrated and overpowered X-Men. I would have preferred a battle among equals rather than an underdog outsmarting his opponent and winning in the end.

Nevertheless, I think this novel is a fine addition to the Mistborn series, and I’m very much looking forward to reading the next one.

Coffee Bean and Tea Reads Rating:

4 out of 5 beans

4 Beans

Flights of Fantasy Reading Challenge 2016

 

I’ve made a number of new year’s resolutions for 2016, and this is one I definitely plan on keeping. I’m joining the Flights of Fantasy Reading Challenge for 2016. This year, I commit to reading 15 books.

Why only 15?

For one, the books I plan to read this year are pretty long. This list includes Words of Radiance (The Stormlight Archive, Book 2) by Brandon Sanderson and The Wise Man’s Fear (The Kingkiller Chronicle, Book 2) by Patrick Rothfuss.

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Secondly, I’m also participating in The Re-Read Challenge this 2016.

Thirdly, I read books in a variety of other genres, including science-fiction, so I plan to read those as well. I wonder if there’s a sci-fi reading challenge somewhere out there? Maybe I should start one someday.

Other books I plan to read for Flights of Fantasy are:

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  • The Alloy of Law (Mistborn, Book 4) by Brandon Sanderson
  • Shadows of Self (Mistborn, Book 5) by Brandon Sanderson
  • Invasion of the Tearling (Queen of the Tearling, Book 2) by Erika Johansen
  • Heir of Fire (Throne of Glass, Book 3) by Sarah J. Maas
  • Queen of Shadows (Throne of Glass, Book 4) by Sarah J. Maas
  • Authority (Southern Reach, Book 2) by Jeff Vandermeer
  • Acceptance (Southern Reach, Book 3) by Jeff Vandermeer
  • The Magicians (The Magicians, Book 1) by Lev Grossman
  • The Sword of Shannara (The Original Shannara Trilogy, Book 1) by Terry Brooks
  • The Lies of Locke Lamora (Gentleman Bastard, Book 1) by Scott Lynch

I’m really excited to be participating in the 2016 FOF Challenge, and I hope to surpass my reading goal for this year.